Celebrating: March Birthdays

March 24th, 2014 / by Roxanne Fequiere / no comments / permalink

Before there was aquamarine, there was bloodstone. Deep green with flecks of red-orange, the stone was believed to have been created when Jesus’ blood dripped down onto the gravel beneath his crucifix. From that violent origin story came a strong association with courage and battle, as referenced in this traditional verse: “Who in this world of ours their eyes/ In March first open shall be wise/ In days of peril firm and brave/ And wear a bloodstone to their grave.” 

During the early twentieth century, the the National Association of Jewelers—followed by the general public—demoted the bloodstone to secondary status, putting aquamarine in its place. A blue or turquoise variety of beryl, aquamarine translates to “water of the sea,” and depending on who you ask, the gem comes from mermaids’ treasure chests, can summon the dead , may increase intelligence, and/or was worn by sailors to prevent seasickness.

Mined in Brazil, Madagascar, and Kenya, among a few other far-flung spots, there’s a chance that you may discover some of your own here in the United States, in Wyoming’s Big Horn Mountains. A better bet? Stopping in to Love, Adorned, where there are a number of aquamarine pieces just waiting to be picked up (plus a few bloodstone pieces, for all the traditionalists out there).

What’s in store: 

1) A 14K gold and aquamarine ring—made in the ’80s, just right for today. 

vintage 14k gold ring aquamarine wedding ring

 2) Multifaceted teardrop earrings set in 18K gold, made by Lola Brooks.

lola brooks aquamarine teardrop earrings

3) Raw bars of aquamarine wrapped in gold and strung onto a Lou Zeldis necklace-cum-art piece.

lou zeldis aquamarine bars necklace

4) An 18K gold single trident earring, punctuated with an aquamarine and created by Chad Ypon.

photo 3

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,